Systematic review of barriers and facilitators to hearing aid uptake in older adults

  • L. Jenstad | ljenstad@audiospeech.ubc.ca The University of British Columbia, School of Audiology and Speech Sciences,Vancouver, Canada.
  • J. Moon The University of British Columbia, School of Audiology and Speech Sciences,Vancouver, Canada.

Abstract

A key element to success in the implementation of any screening for a health condition is that an effective treatment is available, accessible, and complied with. As the main treatment for adult-onset hearing loss is hearing aids, but only about 25% of those who could benefit from hearing aids actually use them (e.g., Kochkin, 2000; Meister, et al., 2008), it is necessary to identify the factors that affect compliance with this treatment recommendation. Several investigators have explored the barriers that may prevent those with hearing loss from choosing to purchase and use hearing aids to assist with their communication needs (e.g., Meister, et al., 2008). Among some of the barriers to hearing aid use are stigmatization, underestimation of hearing loss by the individual, coping strategies, personality factors, low trust in hearing aid benefit, cognitive and functional restrictions, cost, false expectations (Meister, et al., 2008), and communication styles (Helvik, et al., 2008). The goal of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify the main barriers and facilitators to hearing aid (HA) uptake in healthy elderly (age 65+) non-users of hearing aids who have hearing loss (i.e., have been diagnosed as having hearing loss and had hearing aids recommended, but did not purchase aids).

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Published
2011-03-23
Keywords:
hearing aids, utilization, barriers elderly, systematyc review.
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How to Cite
Jenstad, L., & Moon, J. (2011). Systematic review of barriers and facilitators to hearing aid uptake in older adults. Audiology Research, 1(1), e25. https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2011.e25