State-of-the-art assessment allows for improved vestibular evoked myogenic potential test-retest reliability

  • Lydia Behtani School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Canada.
  • Maxime Maheu School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal; CIUSSS Centre-Sud-de-l’île-de-Montréal/Institut Raymond-Dewar, Canada.
  • Audrey Delcenserie School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal; Departement of Psychology, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.
  • Mujda Nooristani School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Canada.
  • François Champoux | francois.champoux@umontreal.ca School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal; CIUSSS Centre-Sud-de-l’île-de-Montréal/Institut Raymond-Dewar, Canada.

Abstract

The goal of the present study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability values of myogenic responses using the latest guidelines for vestibular assessment. Twenty-two otologically and neurologically normal adults were assessed twice, on two different days. The analyses were carried out using interclass correlations. The results showed that the latest recommendations for vestibular assessment lead to test-retest reliability values that are as high, or greater, than those reported in previous studies. The results suggest that state-of-the-art testing, using the latest recommendations as well as electromyography control, improves reliability values of myogenic responses, more specifically for the cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. The impact of small differences in experimental procedures on the reliability values of myogenic responses is also addressed.

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Published
2018-09-20
Section
Brief Reports
Keywords:
Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, Reliability, Vestibular
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How to Cite
Behtani, L., Maheu, M., Delcenserie, A., Nooristani, M., & Champoux, F. (2018). State-of-the-art assessment allows for improved vestibular evoked myogenic potential test-retest reliability. Audiology Research, 8(2). https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2018.212